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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
-term, calling for a "fundamental rethinking of our built environment." one key issue: how to protect the new york subway system which experienced the worst damage in it's 108 year history. many stations remain submerged under several feet of water even as limited operations are expected to resume tomorrow. but infrastructure renovations are not always a clear fix. mayor michael bloomberg, who has taken a number of steps to make new york a greener city, has not yet proposed a major infrastructure change that might deal with rising water levels, for example. but he warned again today that citizens and policymakers need to take climate change predictions seriously. >> it's not the sort of thing that you can ever say for sure but the consequences of making a mistake in either direction are pretty severe and i think what we have to do is learn from this and protect our infrastructure to the extent possible. the bottom line is we've lost some people, we have to make sure we help their families and pray for them. we have to at the same time ensure that we go forward here and keep the city going. >>
your portfolio and making sure you're in sthooks can outperform in a rising interest rate environment-- which is another thing we're worried about-- longer term makes some sense. >> tom: so rising interest rate environment, possibly higher inflation, higher taxes. not exactly the most shiny of forecasts for investors. >> well, there is something you can do about it. you can avoid that tax drag by maximizing your investments in qualified plans. you can keep up with modest inflation by making sure you have your asset allocation mix right. inflation really picks the pocket of the bond investor, but dividend paying stocks and dividends of the markets can keep up with a modestly rising inflation environment. we have seen dividend increases some in the s & p this year and we have seen it as sigh sign of confidence in the management and we think they will put the cash to work once the uncertainty of the election is out. >> energy is one of the stowks like, traditionally a dividend area. but the price of energy stocks has gotten hit lately. >> it has. sectors underperformed but the balance sh
of the energy. and we didn't talk about the effects of the ways we would get it on either the environment or, more broadly, on the globe. >> nonetheless, did the debates matter? do you think they've had an impact on the campaign? >> yes, and what we, what we saw across the debates is what we expected to see. we saw learning about those issues that were addressed. more accurate placement of candidates on the areas in which they differ. what we didn't see is more accurate placement on areas that they're similar because the news never stresses areas in which they're similar. but nonetheless, we've seen learning across the debates in our annenberg survey. >> but my sense is that when there is no penalty for lying or as jonathan swift says in the last part of "gulliver's", for saying the thing that is not so, that the things one learns about what people say are completely irrelevant. governor romney has changed his position on just about everything throughout his entire career. and that, i believe, bedevils the fact checkers who will say, "well, his official position is this, but then he did that
with the high frequency trading environment. we're in an entirely different situation now in the last five years. even the locations. one of the very interesting parts of that is very mysterious about how could you have work if you had disruptions. >> tom: colocation is when a broker or trader puts their computer next to the exchange computer sometimes at the exchange. >> and finally, david, are you confident that the exchanges are ready to go tomorrow? >> i think they will be. if they say they are. this is a market situation. the exchanges know what's going on. they say they're ready. i'm confident they will be there. >> tom: you've been in that seat before. david ruder with us from the cme group, former chairman of the securities and exchange commission. >> tom: lincoln ellis is the chief investment officer with the strategic financial group. with us from chicago. do you think a cautious day of trading or a wild day of volatility? >> well, probably a bit of both. as you know, it's the month's end, and you have a fair amount of portfolio rebalancing that will happen tomorrow. that combineed wit
think of hope for the environment, or food, clothing, shelter? we do. weyerhaeuser, growing ideas. >> just going to keep on keeping on, until every single person out there who needs to vote is going to go vote. >> this week on "inside washington," the endgame. the last debate. >> nothing governor romney just said is true. attacking >> me is not talking about how we deal with the challenges in the middle east. >> the women's vote and the return of the abortion debate. >> i think even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape that it is something that god intended to happen. >> the colin powell endorsement. >> i was proud to learn that we have colin powell's support in this campaign. >> you have to wonder if that is based on issues or whether he has a slightly reason for preferring president obama -- a slightly different reason for preferring president obama. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we are all most of their pit believe it or not, at the election is now less than two weeks away and both candidates are running as if there is no to
the context of school in the rural environment. she did that for 25 years. she recognized that it was her entire life, that in order for her to live another chapter of her life, she had to leave the organization. at the same time she realized that the organization needed new leadership. so she really planned her exit very ritualized. the transition was done with great smoothness and alacrity and grace. what she discovered in leaving there was that in order to find her so low voice, in order to emerge to a new chapter, she had to leave the organization which had been a collective voice. she had organized and built that organization showed that it was a very collaborative organization. tavis: i want to give the reader a sense of how easy it is to navigate. since you mentioned alacrity and grace, i think we are all struggling with how, when we come upon these endings in our lives, how we exit with purposefulness, how we do it with dignity and grace. have you figured out the answer to that important question? >> the last chapter of the book is grace. as it should be, it is the final exit. it
them into interactive environments. it is giving tools to teachers. when kids get together, they are going to talk to each other and talk to the teachers. they will be rated on how good they are expressing themselves and interacting with their peers. >> the new book from salman khan is called "the one world schoolhouse." we have just scratched the surface on a very deep subject. it was a delight to have you on the program. that is our show for tonight. as always, thanks for watching. and keep the faith. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with -- a look at the final weeks of this campaign. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunge
to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where he was alone. >> narrator: then, when he was ten, his mother sent him to hawaii to live with his grandparents. >> i think it's natural to assume that your father be absent, then form a relationship with your stepfather, and then be separated from him and be separated from your mother and go live with your grandparents who at that point you don't really know that well... it must have been profoundly unsettling. >> his early life is a constant stream of people leaving, of him being left. his mother, his father, his grandparents constantly moving. his whole life is really a, sort of a classic search for home. >> narrator: they lived in a small two-bedroom high-rise apartment in honolulu. >> his grandfather was a heavy drinker. what surprised me as i was researching my book was actually the president himself telling me that h
one storm is as a result of that. but overall we have an environment in which the storms are going to be more intense. >> rose: look at the lessons. where do you put the three or four most important lessons we need to learn from this. >> when you talk about what are you going to do about coastal cities, what sort of defenses will you put in place if you want to have a city like manhan that's right on the coast, it's at sea level. can we not have that many people living close to the sea. we have almost 4 million americans living a if few feet of high tide. is it right to be insuring that kind of property as well. we also have to think about climate change. we can argue endlessly really and scientists do over exactly how much climate change plays what role with weather. but we know enough to take steps to deal with it. we know enough to have a plan in place to reduce carbon emissions over time. we don't have absolute certainly in foreign policy and the economy, we can't wait around until we know for certain we need to take steps now. >> rose: that's what the mayor pointed to, carb
brother who was a skateboarder. and how within the environment that she is living because of situations that you get put through coup tour, it's very elegant, you know, but there is the brother, sort of completely out of place. i quite like that out of place. >> rose: the next one is stella tenet. >> this was done for american vogue, with grace comington for-- if i get it right i think it was -- >> you like black and white or color? >> i like color. >> rose: dow. >> yeah. i think life is in color. it's very funny. >> rose: but look at your clothes. >> exactly. because i do it in my pictures. but you should see me before, i had a lyle ago terry cloth suit with platform shoes. you know, i was pretty loud. >> rose: lilac. >> yes, i love lilac. >> rose: the next is hillary rodo, jessica stam, mia. >> these i did for french vogue. karen has this eccentric side to her, she loves something that is sort of off. and these are very, you were asking me about interest, what they do. and what i have noticed, they all bring different sides of me. you know i work with the americans, the english, the f
opportunity thousand ten environment where republican enthusiasm prevail they have a very tight in ohio instead. >> rose: okay. but do you say when you look at all of these polls, i have noted you are a statistician, you noted in the polling you measure other polls? >> rightment. >> rose: do you measure them all together orr say we have ten polls out there, some may be better than others? we have a tradition and history, others may be fly-by-night. >> we do partially discriminate or discriminate is wrong the term wrong term. >> rose: the probability of the poll. >> if this stress a better track record and a better methodology if a member of a professional polling methodology, the other important thing by the way is do you call voters who have cell phones only? about a third of american households now don't have a land line in their homes, some polls that are on the cheap will skip those voters entirely kind of effectively disenfranchising them we found polls that do include cellphones as you should, tend to have slightly better results for presidenpresident obama. >> rose: i think the
our infrastructure, our built environment. >> rose: new york city mayor michael bloomberg began and ended his briefing at city hall with words to those who lost hay loved one in the hurricane. new yorkers everywhere joined him extending their thoughts to the victims of disaster. >> everyone here hearts go out to the families of those who lost family in the storm and those who lost their homes. our thoughts and prayers are with everyone and we certainly will give our full support in the next weeks and months to those hurt by the storm. >> rose: we turn to an interview we taped earlier this week with the actor denzel washington. and director bob zemeckis. >> it all comes down to the script for me. when i read a screen play that i can't put down, and when i read a screen play that's unique and really well written and complex, i feel it's worthy to do. and then i heard that denzel was interested in doing it, and when iwhen i read the screen play it was like he was perfect for the part. so i called him up and said, are you really interested in this?" and he said, "year, i am." >> num
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)